Modeling of silvopastoral watersheds





There has been a growing global concern over watershed degradation and its implications to water resources and ecosystem sustainability. This concern is particularly pronounced in recent decades due to large-scale land use change resulting from human activities and climate change. Watershed restoration and sustainable management have been increasingly accepted as effective tools to improve watershed functions and health, and thus maximize the ecological services such as clean and stable water resource supply. Thus, it is critical to identify and address significant knowledge gaps and to develop innovative techniques to support implementation of watershed restoration practices and policies.

The coupling mechanism of eco-hydrological processes across multiple scales and the implications of watershed restoration to ecosystem sustainability will be of paramount importance for effective design and implementation of ecosystem restoration programs, and for developing rational land management strategies.



Objectives & Themes


- Basic and integrated terrestrial hydrologic processes

- Global change impacts on eco-hydrology from micro- to meso-scales

- Scaling eco-hydrology using remote sensing, GIS and modeling

- Watershed restoration effects on water quality and quantity

This project therefore aims at developing an effective and integrated land management and monitoring approach for community stakeholders, which include local land owners, communities, authorities and resource managers, as they are required to make coherent, informed decisions regarding land resources and their future. In this context, the project will make use of local knowledge, GIS and remote sensing technology to inform effective decision making.


The results from this study will enhance economic, ecologic and social development through the dissemination of findings and the transfer of ideas to: (i) local communities; (ii) the wider scientific community; and (iii) other community planning initiatives within the region.



 
Jonathan Hagen
 

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